CAPITAL CORP. SYDNEY

73 Ocean Street, New South Wales 2000, SYDNEY

Contact Person: Callum S Ansell
E: callum.aus@capital.com
P: (02) 8252 5319

WILD KEY CAPITAL

22 Guild Street, NW8 2UP,
LONDON

Contact Person: Matilda O Dunn
E: matilda.uk@capital.com
P: 070 8652 7276

LECHMERE CAPITAL

Genslerstraße 9, Berlin Schöneberg 10829, BERLIN

Contact Person: Thorsten S Kohl
E: thorsten.bl@capital.com
P: 030 62 91 92

SECURITY

SECURITY

Like most things in nuQ, the rules for converting earnings, deductions and cost codes to their general ledger equivalents are held in tables which can be easily modified or added to as required. It would be difficult in a limited space to set out all the conversion possibilities catered for.

On a simple payroll it is normally just a matter of entering all the general ledger account numbers in a table and in another table specifying the general ledger code associated with a particular earning or deduction. This can be amplified by specifying that combinations of earnings and all or portions of a cost code go to different general ledger accounts.

For more complex general ledgers a host of other options and tick boxes are made available in the tables, which cannot be described here. Suffice it to say that nuQ has successfully created general ledger interface files for some very complex general ledgers.

A further option that is available is to specify (again through entries in a table) the contents of each field of a file or Excel spread sheet which is to be created for a particular general ledger. This has been used to successfully create files to interface with a complex Accpac general ledger.

This same facility has been used to generate Excel spread sheets for complicated reports that are required, obviating the need for a special report to be written.

As we come across new apparently impossible to solve requirements, we develop new or enhance existing generalised facilities to make it comparatively easy for a user to meet their requirements. We do not believe in solving problems by writing special programs but would rather provide enhanced facilities (which are then available to all users) which non-programmers can use to produce the desired results.